With the launch of the new ziggy cup by Intimina, we thought it was about time that we break down the pros and cons and main differences of these two menstrual cups! Menstrual disks first came onto the market under the brand name instead soft cups. They were then marketed as soft cups and reusable soft cups which were a more durable version of the single-use soft cups and were available in most pharmacies and chemists including in the UK. The soft cup brand was taken over by The Flex Company in 2016 and they are now available under the brand-name Flex and soft cup they are the same product just with different packaging.

These menstrual disks offered the user 12 hours of protection with the convenience of disposability, as they are a single-use product. Not exactly eco-friendly. They also have an extremely high-capacity so are good for people with heavy periods that have a low cervix. Menstrual disks are worn like a diaphragm so the experience of using one is completely different to a menstrual cup.

Menstrual disks are very easy to insert but they can take a bit of getting used to as you have to push it far enough up behind your pubic bone. You’ll actually have to push it up higher than you think. Removing it is very easy to but it can be quite messy and we’ve found it to be messier than a conventional menstrual cup due to the collection bag being so thin. We are personally not a fan of the removal process as the entire surface of the disk will be covered in menstrual blood, removing it in the shower is definitely recommended.

The main hype around these menstrual disks is that they can be worn during penetrative sex because they are worn like a diaphragm.  However, we’ve seen a few horror stories of it moving out of place and causing a bloodbath during sex so in our opinion just throw down a towel and get on with having fun if period sex is your thing. If you want to give it ago we recommend inserting a brand-new menstrual disk just before you have sex. Also, menstrual disks are not a replacement for contraception.

Menstrual disks can be just as reliable as a conventional menstrual cup and hold more but a big downside to menstrual disks is that if they don’t fit your body there is no wiggle room, you can’t really try any different techniques or cut the stem. They either fit you or they don’t!

To summarise.
We’d recommend giving a menstrual disk a go if you aren’t able to get along with traditional menstrual cups or if you have a low cervix and need the extra capacity that menstrual disks offer. We all come in different shapes and sizes and it would be great to see more variety in the sizes of menstrual disks available.

Pros:
You can wear it during penetrative sex.
Menstrual disks offer a high-capacity
Suitable for all activities including swimming
Different placement so may relieve any bladder sensitivity.

Cons:
More expensive than a conventional menstrual cup.
They can be difficult to fit correctly.
They are messy to use.
Only comes in one size.

Have you tried a menstrual disk? If so let us know what you thought of it in the comments.

  • Claricup Menstrual Cup

    £15.00
  • Diva Cup Menstrual Cup

    £20.99
  • Fun Cup Explore Kit

    £33.99